#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #inertia.js

Vite with Laravel: Using Inertia.js

How to set up Inertia.js in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #typescript

Vite with Laravel: Using TypeScript

How to set up TypeScript in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #react

Vite with Laravel: Using React

How to set up React in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #vue

Vite with Laravel: Using Vue.js

How to set up Vue.js in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #tailwind

Vite with Laravel: Using Tailwind CSS

How to set up Tailwind CSS in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools #blade

Vite with Laravel: Auto-refresh Blade views

How to set up Tailwind CSS in Vite with Laravel.

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#laravel #vite #frontend #build-tools

Vite with Laravel

I’ve had an eye on Vite for a while. With a stable release out the door (2.0, as 1.0 never left the release candidate stage) it seemed like a good time to give it a shot.

Vite is a frontend build tool like webpack. Instead of bundling development assets, Vite serves native ES modules transpiled with esbuild from the dev server. This means there’s a lot less bundling to do, and results in a very fast developer experience. For production builds, Vite uses Rollup to bundle the assets.

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#programming #frontend / blog.royalsloth.eu

The complexity that lives in the GUI

RoyalSloth reviews the three most common patterns to model interconnected state in a user interface.

  • Connect the boxes: create the user avatar component and pass its instance to the inventory table component
  • Lift the state up: move the internal state of the user avatar component and the state of the inventory table into a separate box/class
  • Introduce a message bus: connect the inventory table and the user avatar component to the shared pipe that is used for distributing events in the application

Connect the boxes and lift the state up seem to be the most common choices for React apps; respectively prop drilling and context or single state trees (like Redux).

There’s no silver bullet to UI complexity, all methods have their caveats.

Read the full article on blog.royalsloth.eu.