Live updating Oh Dear! status pages

| 2 min read

Last week Oh Dear! launched a new status pages feature. I designed them and implemented their frontend. Here's a live example on status.flareapp.io.

We were originally going to use Vue for the pages, so we could make the entire view reactive so we could easily fetch and update data with AJAX or websockets. I started building the status page view, but quickly became hesitant about the decision to use Vue. It didn't feel like the right tool for the job.

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Fast software, the best software

In his most recent essay, Craig Mod explores the effect of optimizing software for speed.

Speed and reliability are often intuited hand-in-hand. Speed can be a good proxy for general engineering quality. If an application slows down on simple tasks, then it can mean the engineers aren’t obsessive detail sticklers. Not always, but it can mean disastrous other issues lurk. I want all my craftspeople to stickle.

My newfound love for Hugo echoes this sentiment. It’s not the friendliest tool, but it’s speed and focus on doing one thing right makes it a joy to use.

That said, Sublime Text has – in my experience – only gotten faster. I love software that does this: Software that unbloats over time. This should be the goal of all software. The longer it’s around, the more elegant it should become. Smooth over like a river stone. I have full trust in the engineering of Sublime Text because I’ve used it for over a decade, but also because it always feels like a fast, focused tool (even though it’s actually very complicated) and has only become faster the longer I’ve used it.

Software that unbloats over time. What a beautiful idea.

Another excerpt that just had to be quoted:

Google Maps used to be a fast, focused tool. It’s now quite bovine. If you push the wrong button, it moos. Clunky, you could say. Overly complex. Unnecessarily layered.

Read the full essay on craigmod.com.



Forget about component lifecycles and start thinking in effects

| 3 min read

React components have always relied on lifecycle methods for side effects. While lifecycle methods get the job done, they're often overly verbose and have large margins for error.

It's easy to forget to “clean up” a side effect when a component unmounts, or update the side effect when props change. As Dan Abramov preaches: Don't stop the data flow.

React recently introduced a new way to deal with side effects: the useEffect hook. Translating lifecycle methods to useEffect calls can be confusing at first. It's confusing because we shouldn't be translating imperative lifecycle methods to declarative useEffect calls in the first place.

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Migrating my site to Hugo

| 1 min read

This blog was a custom Laravel application for the past few years. While I was happy with the Laravel solution, I'm slowly trying to move away from maintaining my own servers. I'm also drawn to the simplicity and stability of serving plain html, so I decided to look into static site generators.

I quickly discovered that Hugo was what I was looking for. Hugo is a very fast and very popular static site generator.

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My favorite part of our company website

| 1 min read

Some time last year, we released the latest iteration of the Spatie.be website.

Our company homepage, screenshot taken on 2019-06-17

There's a succinct description of what we're about, followed by a peculiar little block, dubbed “Latest insights from the team”.

Unlike other agencies, we don't have a company blog. We encourage everyone to write on their own blog and put their latest articles in the spotlight.

Everyone keeps ownership of their content.

There's nothing fancy backing this feature, blog entries are synced via RSS. If you're interested in implementing something similar in PHP, our source code is available on GitHub.


React for Vue developers

| 14 min read

For the past three years, I've been using both React and Vue in different projects, ranging from smaller websites to large scale apps.

Last month I wrote a post about why I prefer React over Vue. Shortly after I joined Adam Wathan on Full Stack Radio to talk about React from a Vue developer's perspective.

We covered a lot of ground on the podcast, but most things we talked about could benefit from some code snippets to illustrate their similaraties and differences.

This post is a succinct rundown of most Vue features, and how I would write them with React in 2019 with hooks.

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Full Stack Radio 114: React for Vue developers

I had the honor to be a guest on Full Stack Radio with Adam Wathan.

We talked about why I prefer React over Vue — which I wrote about two weeks ago — and how to implement some patterns that Vue provides out of the box but aren't explicitly available in React. Examples include computed properties, events and slots.

Adam's quote:

In this episode, Adam talks to Sebastian De Deyne about learning React from the perspective of a Vue developer, and how to translate all of the Vue features you're already comfortable with to React code.

Tune in on fullstackradio.com or on your favorite podcatcher!